The Society Of the Cincinnati in The State of Connecticut

The Capture of the Hessians at Trenton, December 26, 1776-1828. Left: Jonathan Trumbull Jr. (1740-1809) - Speaker of the Us House of Representatives. Right: Jonathan Trumbull Sr. (1710-1785) - Governor of Connecticut
The Battle of Bunker's Hill, June 17, 1775. Right: William Hull (1753-1825) - Lieutenant-Colonel in the Continental Army
The Resignation of General Washington, December 23, 1783. Left: Thomas Y. Seymour (1757-1811) - Lieutenant in the 2nd Continental Regiment of the Dragoons
The Death of General Mercer at the Battle of Princeton, January 1777

Category Archive: Battle of Green Spring

  • Capt Richard Douglas/Douglass (CT/NY)

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    Death:

    Richard Douglas died in 1816.

    Military:

    Private in the Lexington Alarm, April, 1775; Ensign and Regimental Quartermaster in Selden’s Connecticut State Regiment, 20th June to 25th December, 1776; 2d Lieutenant 1st Connecticut, 1st January, 1777; 1st Lieutenant, 1st January 1778; Captain Lieutenant, 11th August, 1780; Captain, 22d August 1780; transferred to 5th Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; transferred to 3d Connecticut, 1st January, 1783; transferred to Swift’s Consolidated Connecticut Regiment, June, 1783, and served to 3d November, 1783.

    References:

    Connecticut, Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p. 353.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 202.

    Military service posted by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Ensign Jacob Kingsbury

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    Birth:

    Jacob Kingsbury was born 06 July 1756 at Franklin, Connecticut.

    Death:

    Jacob Kingsbury died at Franklin, Connecticut on 01 July 1837. On 19 July 1837, the Norwich Courier published the following obituary for Jacob Kingsbury

    At Franklin, July 1st, Jacob Kingsbury, Esq., formerly Inspector General in the army of the United States, aged 81 years. He served his country in the army and Navy forty years, faithfully. He joined the army at Roxbury, near Boston, in the year 1775, at the commencement of the Revolution, in the 18th year of his age, and continued in the service of the U.S. until 1815, at the close of the war with the English. For 30 years previous to the close of the last war, he had not been a day out of the army. He was a member of the Society Cincinnati – also a member of the United States military Philosophical Society, and of the Lyceum of Natural History in the city of New York.

    Military:

    Private and Corporal 8th Connecticut, 11th July to 16th December, 1775; Sergeant Selden’s Connecticut State Regiment, June to December, 1776; Ensign of Webb’s Continental Regiment, 26th April, 1780; transferred to 3d Connecticut 1st January, 1781; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment, June 1783, and served to 3d November, 1783.

    Lieutenant United States Infantry Regiment, 15th October, 1787; Lieutenant 1st United States Infantry, 29th September, 1789; Captain, 28th September, 1791; assigned to 1st Sub Legion, 4th September, 1792; assigned to 1st United States Infantry, 1st November 1796; Major 2d infantry, 15th May 1797; Lieutenant-Colonel 1st Infantry, 11th April, 1803; Colonel, 18th August, 1808. (Colonel Inspector-General, 8th April, 1813 to 31st October, 1814.) Honorably discharged upon the reorganization of the Army, 15th June, 1815.

    When discharged in June 1815, Jacob Kingsbury’s eight year’s of service during the Revolution and continuous service since 1787 probably made him the senior man in years of service in the army.

    Cincinnati:

    Original member.

    References:

    Edward M. Coffman. The old army: a portrait of the American Army in peacetime, 1784-1898. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986. p. 44.

    Connecticut, Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p. 352.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 333.

    Francis B. Heitman. Historical Register of the United States Army, From Its Organization, September 29, 1789, to September 29, 1889. Washington, D.C.: National Tribune, 1890. p. 390.

    James Ripley Jacobs. The Beginning of the U.S. Army, 1782-1812. Fort Washington, N.Y.: Kennikat Press, 1972. p. 173.

    “Died”, em>Norwich (Connecticut> Courier, 19 July 1837, p. 3; digital image, GenealogyBank.com (http://www.GenealogyBank.com : accessed 12 January 2016).

    Wiley Sword. President Washington’s Indian War: the struggle for the Old Northwest, 1790-1795. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1993. pp 127-128.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Lt William Linn (Lynn)

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    Birth:

    William Linn, son of Alexander and Mary Linn, was born at Haddam, Middlesex County, Connecticut on 31 December 1755.

    William Lynn had a brother, David Lynn, who served under him in the Revolutionary War. He also had a sister who in 1831 lived in a remote part of Middlesex County, Connecticut, and another brother, who lived in a remote part of the country..

    Death:

    William Lynn died sometime before 11 June 1831 when his brother, David Lynn, while living in Durham, Middlesex County, Connecticut, applied for bounty land which was due the . . . . heirs of William Lynn on account of his service in the Revolutionary War and Warrant 1763 for two hundred acres was issued August 24, 1831.

    According to a statement made by David Lynn in 1832, William Lynn may have died as early as 1792. David Lynn, based upon his personal military service in the Revolution, applied for a pension in 1832. A declaration he made on 15 August 1832, states:

    The Company to which the said [David] Lynn was attached was commanded by his brother Lieutenant William Lynn of Killingworth . . . It has supposed he has been dead full forty years.

    In 1831, William Lynn was reported to have left that part of the county [Durham/Killingsworth, Middlesex County, Connecticut] more that forty years before and was then reputed to be dead and that it was believed he never married. The exact date of his death was not given..

    Marriage:

    Testimony given 20 February 1831 by James Francis and Timothy Scranton, former acquaintances of William Lynn, suggests that he may never have married.

    Military:

    Sergeant 2d Connecticut, 1st January, 1777; Ensign, 29th December, 1777; 2nd Lieutenant 9th April, 1780; transferred to 3d Connecticut 1st January, 1781; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment, June 1783 and served to 3d November, 1783.

    In addition to the service reported by Heitman, William Lynn, a Private, served in the 6th Company, Connecticut 7th Regiment under Col. Charles Webb from 10 July through 18 December 1775

    Cincinnati:

    Original Member.

    Discussion:

    William Lynn’s brother, David Lynn resided at Killingworth, Connecticut, when he enlisted in 1780, and served until December, under Captain Martin Lord, Lieutenant William Lynn (his brother) in Colonel Swift’s Connecticut regiment; 6 months. In 1832 he was sixty-eight years of age and resided in Durham, Connecticut; in 1836, he resided in Warren County, Illinois. David Lynn died 20 August 1840 and is buried in the South Henderson Cemetery, Gladstone, Henderson County, Illinois.

    References:

    Connecticut. Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. pp. 82, 158, 330, 352, 367, 368 & 374.

    Connecticut Vital Records to 1870 (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2011.) From original typescripts, Lucius Barnes Barbour Collection, 1928. Haddam, William Lynn.

    Find A Grave, Inc. Find A Grave digital image (http://www.findagrave.com) Gravestone for David Lynn (1764-1840), Memorial #64220076, South Henderson Cemetery, Gladstone, Henderson County, Illinois. Photograph © Sean Flynn.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 362.

    Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 15. Fold3.com(http://www.fold3.com/image/23882970/). Connecticut. William Lynn, Bounty Land Warrant 1763.

    Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 15. Fold3.com(http://www.fold3.com/image/23882858/). Connecticut. David Lynn, Pension S32388.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Lt John Mansfield

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    Birth:

    John Mansfield was born in 1748. He was the son of Moses Mansfield (1709-1754) and Ann Mary Kierstead (1709-1742)

    Death:

    He died at Wallingford, Connecticut on 01 June 1823. His obituary appeared in the Connecticut Herald on 10 June:

    At Wallingford, on the 2d inst. Capt. John Mansfield, in the 75th year of his age – He served his country faithfully during the Revolutionary War—was the same man (then Lieut. Mansfield) who commanded the ”Forlorn Hope”, at the storming of the redoubts at Yorktown—and whose name was honorably mentioned by Col. Hamilton, the Commander of the Detachment—he received a wound in that attack, which would have entitled him to a pension, but he refused to apply for it. When peace was concluded and the Independence of his country acknowledged, he was discharged from the service, with a captain’s commission and the thanks of the Commander and Chief. Poor in purse, but rich in honor, he returned to his family, and by strenuous exertions, succeeded in accumulating a small property. When the pension law was passed in 1818, his friends believed he was entitled to the benefit of that act; he petitioned and received a pension until the law was amended – the stipend was then withdrawn, on the ground that he was not wholly destitute of property, (although his circumstances were far from affluent.) He sustained through life the character of an industrious, honorable, upright man, died lamented by all the friends of worth who knew him.

    Marriage:

    John Mansfield was twice married. First to Sybil Sexton on 20 February 1772, and second to Esther Lewis.

    Children:

    He had two children: Ira Mansfield who settled at Atwater, Ohio, and Sybil Mansfield who married John Hiddleson of Georgetown, South Carolina. Ira Mansfield, who married Susan Kirtland, died at Atwater in 1849. Sybil Hiddleson and her husband, John, both died in Wallingford, Connecticut.

    Occupation:

    Farmer.

    Military:

    Sergeant 1st Connecticut, 1st May to 28th November, 1775; Ensign of Douglas’ Connecticut State Regiment, 20th June to 25th December, 1776; 2d Lieutenant 6th Connecticut, 1st January, 1777; 1st Lieutenant, 18th April, 1779; transferred to 4th Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; wounded at Yorktown, 14th October 1781; transferred to 2d Connecticut, 1st January, 1783, and served to 3d June, 1783.

    A more expansive discussion of John Mansfield’s military service follows:

    John Mansfield was a Sergeant in the company of Isaac Cook, Jr., in the 1st regiment, Colonel David Wooster, raised on the first call for troops in April-May, 1775. He served in New York and on Long Island during the summer. In September, his unit marched to the Northern Department, where it served under General Schuyler about Lakes George and Champlain. In October, he was present at the reduction of St. Johns. He was discharged 28 November 1775.

    In June, 1776, he was Ensign of the 6th company of the 5th battalion, Wadsworth’s brigade, commanded by Colonel William Douglas, raised to reinforce Washington’s army at New York. He served in the city and at the right of the line during the Battle of Long Island, 27 August; was at the battle of White Plains, 28 October, and continued in service until 25 December 1776. He reenlisted in the Connecticut Line on 01 January 1777. On 14 March 1777, he was commissioned a Lieutenant in the 6th regiment, Connecticut Line which was raised to continue through the war. The regiment went into camp at Peekskill in the summer and served during the fall in Parsons’ brigade on the Hudson. It wintered, 1777-78, at West Point and in the summer was encamped with the main army at White Plains. It wintered, 1778-79, at Redding, and in the summer of 1779 served on the east side of the Hudson. It wintered, 1779-80, at Morristown Huts, New Jersey, and in the summer of 1780, it served on both sides of the Hudson. It wintered, 1780-81, at camp “Connecticut Village,” opposite West Point, and there consolidated for formation of 1781-1783. In this formation, John Mansfield continued as a Lieutenant in the 4th regiment, Connecticut Line, and was present with the regiment at Yorktown.

    In the attack upon Redoubt #10 at Yorktown, a “forlorn hope” of 20 men under Lieutenant Mansfield led the column. Mansfield was among the first to enter the redoubt and received a bayonet wound. The entire action was accomplished in less than 10 minutes in which under furious fire the attacking troops climbed over or broke through obstructions, crossed a defensive ditch, scaled the parapet and captured the redoubt. Lt. Col. Alexander Hamilton reported that Mansfield, of Lt. Col. Jean-Joseph Sourbader de Gimat’s battalion, deserved particular recognition for his “coolness, firmness, and punctuality”.

    In the formation of January-June, 1783, he continued as Lieutenant in the 2nd Regiment, Connecticut Line, commanded by Colonel Heman Swift, in service at West Point and vicinity, until in early June when the regiment was disbanded with the greater portion of the army by orders of Washington.

    Cincinnati:

    Original member.

    Sources:

    Frances Atwater, comp. Centenniel of Meriden, June 10-16, 1906. Meriden, CT: Journal Publishing Company, 1906. pp 232-233.

    Frederic William Bailey. Early Connecticut marriages as found on ancient church records prior to 1800.. vol. 4. New Haven, Conn.: Bureau of American ancestry, 1899. p. 61.

    Connecticut. Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889.

    “Died”. Connecticut Herald. New Haven, Connecticut. 10 June 1823. p 3., col. 4.

    William Richard Cutter. Genealogical and family history of the state of Connecticut: a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the founding of a nation. vol. 4. New York: Lewis historical publishing company. 1911. pp 1734 & 1738-1739.

    Charles Henry Stanley Davis, History of Wallingford, Conn., From Its Settlement In 1670 to the Present Time, Including Meriden, Which Was One of Its Parishes Until 1806, And Cheshire, Which Was Incorporated In 1780. Meriden: The author, 1870. p. 847.

    Eckenrode, H. J. Official guidebook of the Yorktown sesquicentennial celebration, October 16-19, 1931. Richmond: Virginia Yorktown sesquicentennial commission, 1931. p. 14.

    “Letter from Alexander Hamilton to Marquis de Lafayette, [15 October 1781],” Founders Online, National Archives (http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-02-02-1200-0001 [last update: 2015-12-30]). Source: The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, vol. 2, 1779–1781, ed. Harold C. Syrett. New York: Columbia University Press, 1961. pp. 679–681.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 378.

    Henry Phelps Johnson, The Yorktown Campaign And the Surrender of Cornwallis, 1781. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1881. pp. 145-146.

    J. E. Norris, R. C. Brown, Warner & Beers. History of Portage County, Ohio: Containing a history of the county, its townships, towns, villages, schools, churches, industries, etc; portraits of early settlers and prominent men; biographies; history of the Northwest territory; history of Ohio; statistical and miscellaneous matter, etc., etc. . . Chicago: Warner, Beers & co., 1885. p 583.

    Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 15. Fold3.com(http://www.fold3.com/image/23586654/). Connecticut. John J.

    Sons of the American Revolution. Connecticut Society. Year-book of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution for 1897-1898. [S.l.]: Committee on Publication, Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, 1900. p. 537.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Lt Ellijah Ransom

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    Death:

    Died 1828.

    Military:

    Sergeant in the Lexington Alarm, April, 1775; 2nd Lieutenant 3rd Connecticut, 1st January, 1777; 1st Lieutenant, 1st May, 1780; transferred to 1st Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; retired March, 1782.

    References:

    Connecticut, Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p. 351.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 458.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray

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  • Capt John Matthius St. John/ St. Joan

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    Military:

    2nd Lieutenant of Silliman’s Connecticut State Regiment, 20th June to 25th December, 1776; 1st Lieutenant 5th Connecticut, 1st January, 1777; Captain, 25th May, 1778; transferred to 2nd Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; resigned 2d May 1781.

    References:

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 521.

    Military service posted by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Lt Robert Allyn/Allen

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    Death:

    Robert Allyn died in 1811.

    Military:

    Sergeant 1st Connecticut, 10th February, 1777; Ensign, 1st November, 1777; 2d Lieutenant, 1st July, 1780; transferred to 5th Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; retired 1st January, 1783.

    References:

    Connecticut, Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p. 353.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 70.

    Military service posted by V. Allen Gray.

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  • 2nd Lt Isaiah Tiffany

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    Birth:

    Isaiah Tiffany was born at Lebanon, Connecticut on 16 February 1759. He was the son of John Tiffany and Mary Meacham.

    Death:

    He died at New Canaan, New York on 12 December 1800.

    Marriage:

    On 4 June 1789, Isaiah Tiffany married Anne Whiting (1762-1830).

    Children:

    The children of Isaiah Tiffany and his wife, Anne, were as follows: Nancy Whiting Tiffany (1791-1849) who married Elihu Phinney; John Lathrop Tiffany (1792-1878) who married Abbey Hoadley; Frederick Trench Tiffany (1795-1863) who married Hetty Elvira Moore; Harriet Bradford Tiffany (1798-1830) who married Charles S. Stewart; and Isaiah Whiting Tiffany (1801-1889) who married Mary Metcalf in early May 1826 at Albany, New York. Mary was the daughter of the late Judge Metcalf. Isaiah Whiting Tiffany was survived by a son and a daughter.

    Military:

    Corporal 1st Connecticut, 14th April, 1777; Sergeant 1st June, 1777; Ensign, 1st January 1778; transferred to 5th Connecticut 1st January, 1781; 2d Lieutenant, 22nd April, 1781; transferred to 2d Connecticut, 1st January 1783; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment 3d June 1783, and served to 3d November, 1783.

    Isaiah Tiffany fought in 18 battles, including Monmouth and Yorktown, and was at Valley Forge. He was one of the forlorn hope in the storming of the redoubts at Yorktown. He was present at the hanging of Major Andre.

    References:

    ”Married”. Albany (New York) Argus, 11 May 1826, p. 3.

    Connecticut, Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p. 353.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 543.

    ”Isaiah Tiffany”. New York (New York) Tribune, Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 07 August 1889, p. 7.

    Nelson Otis Tiffany, The Tiffanys of America: History And Genealogy. Buffalo: N. O. Tiffany, 1901. pp. 126-127.

    ”Died”. Western Star, Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 19 January 1801, p. 3.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray.

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  • 2nd Lt James Bennett

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    Birth:

    James Bennett was born 14 May 1755 at New Milford, Litchfield County, Connecticut. His parents were Caleb Bennett (1716-1790) and Abigail Fowler (abt. 1727-1771).

    Death:

    He died 14 November 1819 at Homer, Cortland County, New York.

    His death was noted in the New York Columbian:

    Another revolutionary patriot gone – At Cortland Village, Col. James Bennet, aged 64. He held a commission in the army of the revolution, and was interred with the honors of masonry.

    The following appeared in the Cortland Republican:

    Died – In this town on the evening of the 13th inst. Col. James BENNET, aged 64, leaving a wife and a large family of children, to lament the loss of a tender husband, a kind and benevolent parent, and one of those early patriots that were signalized by gaining the liberty which they now enjoy.

    Col. BENNET held a commission in the army of the revolution. He was early enrolled under the banner which waved with various prospects for a number of years, amidst the perils of our revolution. He was engaged in a number of the bloody contests that signalized our emancipation; and whether the American eagle retired amidst carnage and destruction from a superior force, or triumphed over our oppressors, and waved victory to its followers, and liberty to its country, his hand was always ready to support the pillar of freedom.

    His neighbors and friends, in disposing of his remains, have demonstrated their respect for the man, and those who have broken the shackles of slavery. He was duly interred by his Masonic brethren, with the usual ceremonies of that order.

    Marriage:

    On 21 November 1784 at Catskill, Greene County, New York, he married Catharine Bogardus. James Bennett died intestate and his wife, Catherine, was granted administration of his estate on 31 October 1821.

    Children:

    James Bennett and Catharine Bogardus had seven children: Nancy Bennett, Adolphus B. Bennett, James A. Bennett, Robert Bennett, Angeline Bennett, Eugene Bennett, and Catharine Bennett.

    Military:

    Sergeant Major of 7th Connecticut, 25th January, 1777; Ensign, 1st September, 1777; 2d Lieutenant, 8th September, 1780; transferred to 2d Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment, June, 1783; and served to 3d November, 1783.

    James Bennett began his Connecticut service in January 1777; he had served already for a year and a half in the New York Continental Line. He detailed his New York service in 1818, when in reduced circumstances, he gave the following deposition in support of a pension application:

    State of New York

    Cortland County

    James Bennet of Homer in the county of Cortland aforesaid State of New York being duly sworn saith that he this deponent is an actual reside of the Town of Homer — that this deponent served in the revolutionary war against the common enemy as follows, to wit, this deponent enlisted in the fore part of the year 1775 into Capt. Daniel Mills Company in the fourth

    [Dutchess] Regiment of the New York line commanded by Col. James Holmes and served as Sergeant in the company until the last day of Decr. in the same year whose time of service expired — further that in the forepart of Jany. 1776 this deponent enlisted into the first New York Regiment commanded by Col. Goose Van Schaick where he served in the capacity of Sergeant Major until the last day of Decr. of that year inclusive when his period of service expired — that in the year 1777 he this deponent was commissioned as an Ensign in the 2nd Connecticut Regiment of foot commanded by Col. Henan Swift in which Regt. and capacity this deponent served until the first day of September 1778 at which time he this deponent was commissioned as a Lieutenant in said Regiment in which office this deponent served until 1783 at the close of the war and was disbanded with the army at west point in June 1783 when the preliminary articles of peace were published and was liable to be called into actual service again until the arrival of the definitive treaty of peace when congress resolved that they had no further service for the continental army — and this deponent further saith that from his reduced circumstances he is in need of assistance from his country — that at the Battle of Monmouth he received a musket shot in his under jaw — that his is old and infirm & has a wife & three children to provide for with no resources but his daily labor —

    And this deponent further saith that on the Eleventh day of Feby. 1798, his house was consumed by an accidental fire & his commissions and all his private papers were also consumed —

    And the said James Bennett hereby relinquishes all claims to any and every pension heretofore granted or allowed him by any law of the United States.

    James Bennet

    Sworn this 13th Day of April 1818.

    Cincinnati:

    Original Member.

    Discussion:

    James Bennett’s father, Caleb Bennett, was a member of New Milford, Connecticut’s Committee of Inspection and Correspondence.

    James’ oldest brother, Isaac Bennett (b. 1747) lived at Stockbridge, Massachusetts and was member of a militia unit in that location. Another brother, Samuel Bennett (b. 1750) is reported in one source to have been a Captain in the Revolution; however, that has not been confirmed. A younger brother, Caleb (b. 1758) was a member of a New Milford militia company from mid 1776 until late 1779 when he moved to Stockbridge, Massachusetts to live with his brother, Isaac.

    References:

    Abstracts of Wills, Administrations and Guardianships in NY State, 1787 – 1835. (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006.) Original manuscript in Eardeley Genealogy Collection: New York State Abstracts of Wills, Brooklyn Historical Society. Cortland, p. 574.

    Connecticut. Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. pp. 218, 328, 352 & 373.

    Cortland Republican, 18 Nov 1819. (http://www.usgenweb.info/nycortland/vitals/d1815-21.htm : accessed 05 March 2015)

    Frank Hasbrouck, The History of Dutchess County, New York, v. 1. Poughkeepsie: S. A. Matthieu, 1909. p. 122.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 99.

    Frank Hasbrouck, ed.,The History of Dutchess County, New York, vol. 1. Poughkeepsie, N.Y.: S. A. Matthieu, 1909, pp. 120-122.

    Donald Lines Jacobus, History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, v. 1. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2007. p. 73.

    “Died”, New-York Columbian, 01 December 1819. p. 2, col. 5.

    Samuel Orcutt, History of the Towns of New Milford and Bridgewater, Connecticut, 1703-1882. Hartford: Press of Case, Lockwood and Brainard Co., 1882. pp. 217, 651-652.

    Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 15. Fold3.com(http://www.fold3.com/image/15190966/). Connecticut. James Bennett, Pension W. 16191.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Capt Roger Welles

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    Birth:

    Roger Welles was born at Wethersfield, Connecticut on 29 December 1753, the son of Solomon Welles, who was born at Wethersfield on 06 October 1721 and died there in 1802.

    Death:

    Roger Welles died on 27 May 1795 while serving as a general of the Connecticut State Militia and a member of the General Assembly.

    Children:

    He had at least two sons: Martin Welles, who was born at Newington, Connecticut on 9 December 1787 and died at Martin, Ohio on 18 January 1863; and Roger Welles, who was born at Newington, Connecticut on 10 August 1790 and died there on 18 November 1859. He was the grandfather of at least the following children: Thomas Norton Welles (1810-1854) of Peoria, Illinois; Edwin Welles (1818-1853) of Newington, Connecticut; Julia Welles Olmstead (1823-____) of Dunlap, Iowa; and Roger Welles (1829-___) of Hartford, Connecticut.

    Education:

    Roger Welles was a graduate of Yale College.

    Military:

    2d Lieutenant of Webb’s Additional Continental Regiment, 1st January, 1777; 1st Lieutenant, 16th May, 1778; Captain, 8th April, 1780; transferred to 3d Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; wounded at Yorktown, 14th October, 1781; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment, June, 1783, and served to November, 1783.

    References:

    Connecticut, Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p. 352.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 580.

    Albert Welles. History of the Welles Family In England And Normandy: With the Derivation From Their Progenitors of Some of the Descendants In the United States. New York, N.Y.: A. Welles, 1876. pp. 168-169, 247 & 288.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Capt Elijah Chapman

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    Birth:

    Elijah Chapman was born at Tolland, Connecticut on 13 February 1753. He was the son of Elijah Chapman and Sarah Steel..

    Death:

    He died on 17 December 1825 at Tolland.

    An obituary for Elijah Chapman appeared In the Salem Gazette:

    In Tolland, (Conn.) Gen. Elijah Chapman, aged 73. Gen. Chapman was the first Sheriff of the county of Tolland, and held that office from the incorporation of the county, in 1786, until his resignation in 1809. He served in the Army of the Revolution from the commencement to the close of the war. He entered the service as a non-commissioned officer, and passed through the different grades of office to the command of a company. He was in two campaigns in the brigade commanded by Gen. Lafayette. Besides many engagements of minor importance, Gen. Chapman was in the battles of Trenton, Monmouth, Germantown, Jamestown, and also at the siege and taking of Yorktown.

    Marriage:

    On 20 October 1783 at Tolland, Elijah Chapman married Sarah Keeler of Ridgefield, Connecticut.

    Children:

    Elijah Chapman and Sarah Keeler had five children who survived early childhood: Polly (b. 1785), Sally (b. 1787), twin sons – Elijah and Reuben (b. 1790) and Fanny (b. 1792).

    Military:

    Private in the Lexington Alarm, April, 1775; 2nd Lieutenant of Ward’s Connecticut State Regiment, 14th May, 1776; 1st Lieutenant 5th Connecticut, 1st January, 1777; Captain Lieutenant, 1st April, 1779; Captain, 20th July, 1780; transferred to 2d Connecticut, 1st January, 1781, and served to June, 1783..

    Elijah, on the day when the news of the battle of Lexington was received, enlisted into the company that was formed on the instant, and was made a sergeant, the a lieutenant, finally a captain, and served in Washington’s army until its dissolution. He was engaged in the battles of Trenton, Princeton, Germantown, and Monmouth, e&., &c. He commanded the third company from the head of the column, that stormed the redoubt at Yorktown. In 1824 La Fayette recognized him as one of his former captains. After the war he rose to the rank of Major-General of Militia.

    Elijah Chapman was issued a bounty land warrant, #375, on 19 May 1797 for 300 acres of land.

    Cincinnati:

    Original Member.

    Elijah Chapman was active in the affairs of the Society.

    New Haven, July 15

    On Tuesday the 7th instant, the State Society of Cincinnati assembled in the Town to celebrate the Twentieth Anniversary of American Independence: The Day was ushered in by firing of Cannon and ringing of Bells — At 11 o’Clock they moved in Procession to the Brick Meeting House, were a crowded Audience were highly entertained with a sermon preached by the Rev. Doctor Dwight, from Isaiah xxxiii, 6. “Wisdom and Knowledge shall be the stability of thy times, and strength of Salvation.” In which were pictured, with a rich variety of sentiment and expressions, the vices which have tarnished and destroyed former Empires, and those virtues which form the durable basis of a happy Government. The Sermon was succeeded by an Oration on the same subject, elegantly written and pronounced by Mf. James Gould. The exercises were interspersed with several beautiful pieces of vocal and instrumental music, performed by the Musical Society. After which the Society returned, and, having completed the business of the day, dined together, and drank a number of patriotic toasts.

    General Ebenezer Huntington was chosen President of the Society for the ensuing year. Delegates were chosen to attend the next general meeting of the Cincinnati in Philadelphia in May of the following year, i.e., 1796. Col. Elijah Chapman, of Tolland County, was appointed to a Committee to whom all Applicants are to be made for Relief from the Funds of the Society. He continued to be a member of the Committee through at least 1803.

    References:

    “New-Haven, July 15”, American Mercury, Hartford, Connecticut, 20 July 1795, p. 3, col. 3.

    Connecticut. Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. pp. 23, 48, 194, 328, 352, 360, & 373.

    Connecticut Vital Records to 1870 (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2011.) From original typescripts, Lucius Barnes Barbour Collection, 1928. Tolland, p. 30.

    Connecticut Vital Records to 1870 (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2011.) From original typescripts, Lucius Barnes Barbour Collection, 1928. Ridgefield, p. 21.

    Daniel Steele Durrie, Steele Family, A Genealogical History of John and George Steele, (Settlers of Hartford, Conn.) 1635-6, and Their Descendants. Albany, N.Y.: J. Musell, 1862. pp. 89-90.

    Benjamin Woodbridge Dwight, The History of the Descendants of Elder John Strong, of Northampton, Mass, vol. 2. Albany, N.Y.: Joel Munsell, 1871. p. 1085

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 151.

    Peter H. Judd, comp. Four American Ancestries: White, Griggs, Cowles, Judd, Including Haring, Phelps, Denison, Clark, Foote, Coley, Haight, Ayers, and Related Families, vol. 3. New York: Peter Haring Judd, 2008. pp. 478-479.

    Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 15. Fold3.com( http://www.fold3.com/image/14082498/). Connecticut. Elijah Chapman, Pension S37848.

    “Deaths”, Salem Gazette, Salem Massachusetts, 03 January 1826, p. 3, col. 4.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Maj John Palgrave Wyllys

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    Military:

    Adjutant of Wolcott’s Connecticut State Regiment, January, 1776; Brigade-Major to General Wadsworth, 7th August, 1776; taken prisoner 15th September, 1776, on the retreat from New York; exchanged 20th December, 1776; Captain of Webb’s Additional Continental Regiment, 1st January, 1777; Major, 10th October, 1778; transferred to 3d Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; transferred to 1st Connecticut, 1st January, 1783; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment, June, 1783, and served to 25th December, 1783; Major United States Infantry Regiment, 9th June, 1785; Major 1st Infantry United States Army, 29th September, 1789; killed 22d October, 1790, in action with Indians on the Miami, Ohio.

    References:

    Connecticut, Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p.351

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 608.

    Military service posted by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Ensign Ebenezer Daggett

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    Birth:

    Ebenezer Dagget was born at New Haven, Connecticutt on 21 December 1760. He was the son of the Rev. Naphtali Daggett, D.D., and Sarah.

    Death:

    Ebenezer Dagget died of smallpox on 20 November 1781 at Head of Elk, Maryland on the return march from Virginia and Yorktown.

    Military:

    Ensign 7th Connecticut 20th June, 1779; transferred to 1st Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; died 20th November, 1781.

    Discussion:

    Two of Ebenezer Daggett’s siblings had issue. His brother, Henry (1758-1843), married Anna Ball. They had nine children. His brother, Ezra (1765-1844), married Eunice Tuttle. They had eleven children.

    Ebenezer’s brother, Henry Daggett, served as a Lieutenant with the 2d Connecticut until 3 June 1783. During course of the war Henry Daggett not only lost his brother, he lost his father.

    During the British raid of New Haven, Connecticut in July 1779, Ebenezer’s father, the Rev. Naphtali Daggett, took up arms against them. He actively opposed the British, incited his students at Yale against them, and openly preached and prayed against them. British troops captured him and after beating him severely left him for dead. He was taken to a nearby house, and when the British troops came to collect him as a prisoner, the mistress of the house refused to surrender him. He died 18 months later from the effects of his beating by British troops.

    References:

    Connecticut. Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p. 352.

    Samuel Bradlee Doggett, A History of the Doggett-Daggett Family. Boston: Press of Rockwell and Churchill, 1894. pp. 119-120 & 147

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 184.

    Henry Phelps Johnston, Yale and her honor-roll in the American revolution, 1775-1783. New York : Privately printed [by G.P. Putnam’s Sons], 1888. p. 340.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray.

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