The Society Of the Cincinnati in The State of Connecticut

The Capture of the Hessians at Trenton, December 26, 1776-1828. Left: Jonathan Trumbull Jr. (1740-1809) - Speaker of the Us House of Representatives. Right: Jonathan Trumbull Sr. (1710-1785) - Governor of Connecticut
The Battle of Bunker's Hill, June 17, 1775. Right: William Hull (1753-1825) - Lieutenant-Colonel in the Continental Army
The Resignation of General Washington, December 23, 1783. Left: Thomas Y. Seymour (1757-1811) - Lieutenant in the 2nd Continental Regiment of the Dragoons
The Death of General Mercer at the Battle of Princeton, January 1777

Category Archive: Swift’s Connecticut Regiment

  • Lt William Linn (Lynn)

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    Birth:

    William Linn, son of Alexander and Mary Linn, was born at Haddam, Middlesex County, Connecticut on 31 December 1755.

    William Lynn had a brother, David Lynn, who served under him in the Revolutionary War. He also had a sister who in 1831 lived in a remote part of Middlesex County, Connecticut, and another brother, who lived in a remote part of the country..

    Death:

    William Lynn died sometime before 11 June 1831 when his brother, David Lynn, while living in Durham, Middlesex County, Connecticut, applied for bounty land which was due the . . . . heirs of William Lynn on account of his service in the Revolutionary War and Warrant 1763 for two hundred acres was issued August 24, 1831.

    According to a statement made by David Lynn in 1832, William Lynn may have died as early as 1792. David Lynn, based upon his personal military service in the Revolution, applied for a pension in 1832. A declaration he made on 15 August 1832, states:

    The Company to which the said [David] Lynn was attached was commanded by his brother Lieutenant William Lynn of Killingworth . . . It has supposed he has been dead full forty years.

    In 1831, William Lynn was reported to have left that part of the county [Durham/Killingsworth, Middlesex County, Connecticut] more that forty years before and was then reputed to be dead and that it was believed he never married. The exact date of his death was not given..

    Marriage:

    Testimony given 20 February 1831 by James Francis and Timothy Scranton, former acquaintances of William Lynn, suggests that he may never have married.

    Military:

    Sergeant 2d Connecticut, 1st January, 1777; Ensign, 29th December, 1777; 2nd Lieutenant 9th April, 1780; transferred to 3d Connecticut 1st January, 1781; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment, June 1783 and served to 3d November, 1783.

    In addition to the service reported by Heitman, William Lynn, a Private, served in the 6th Company, Connecticut 7th Regiment under Col. Charles Webb from 10 July through 18 December 1775

    Cincinnati:

    Original Member.

    Discussion:

    William Lynn’s brother, David Lynn resided at Killingworth, Connecticut, when he enlisted in 1780, and served until December, under Captain Martin Lord, Lieutenant William Lynn (his brother) in Colonel Swift’s Connecticut regiment; 6 months. In 1832 he was sixty-eight years of age and resided in Durham, Connecticut; in 1836, he resided in Warren County, Illinois. David Lynn died 20 August 1840 and is buried in the South Henderson Cemetery, Gladstone, Henderson County, Illinois.

    References:

    Connecticut. Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. pp. 82, 158, 330, 352, 367, 368 & 374.

    Connecticut Vital Records to 1870 (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2011.) From original typescripts, Lucius Barnes Barbour Collection, 1928. Haddam, William Lynn.

    Find A Grave, Inc. Find A Grave digital image (http://www.findagrave.com) Gravestone for David Lynn (1764-1840), Memorial #64220076, South Henderson Cemetery, Gladstone, Henderson County, Illinois. Photograph © Sean Flynn.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 362.

    Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 15. Fold3.com(http://www.fold3.com/image/23882970/). Connecticut. William Lynn, Bounty Land Warrant 1763.

    Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 15. Fold3.com(http://www.fold3.com/image/23882858/). Connecticut. David Lynn, Pension S32388.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Surg Mate Aeneas/Eneas Monson/Munson

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    Birth:

    Aeneas Munson was born 11 September 1763. He was the son of Dr. Aeneas Munson (____-1826) of New Haven, Yale class of 1753, and Susanna Howell (d. 1803). His father was a founder of the Connecticut Medical Society.

    Death:

    Aeneas Munson’s death occurred on 22 August 1852. (Heitman lists his death date as 16 June 1826, which is that of his father.)

    Marriage:

    Aeneas Munson married Mary Shepherd (1772-1848) on 03 May 1794.

    Children:

    Aeneas and Mary Munson were the parents of the following children: Alfred Shepherd Munson (1795-1870) who married Mary Ann Tarten in 1822. Frederick Munson (1797-1803). Charles Munson (1799-1890) who never married. Eneas Munson (1800-1805). Mary Ann Pomeroy Munson (1803-1844) who married George Younglove Cutler in 1821. John Munson (1808-1810). William Munson (1811-1812).

    Education:

    Aeneas Munson graduated from Yale in 1780..

    Occupation:

    After the war, Aeneas Munson practiced medicine at New Haven, Connecticut as had his father before him.

    Military:

    Surgeon’s Mate of Webb’s Continental Regiment, March, 1779; transferred to 4th Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; transferred to 3d Connecticut, 1st January, 1783; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment, June, 1783, and served to November, 1783.

    Yale and her honor-roll in the American revolution, 1775-1783 provides the following account of Aenea Munson’s service:

    Very soon after graduation or September 1, 1780, Munson was commissioned Surgeon’s Mate in Col. Swift’s Seventh Connecticut Continental Line. During the winter of 1780-81 his regiment was hutted with the Connecticut Division on the Hudson, opposite West Point. In June following he was detached to assist Surgeon Thacher, of the Massachusetts Line, in Col. Scammell’s Light Infantry corps, which, after engaging in one or two sharp skirmishes in Westchester County, marched in August with the army to Yorktown, Virginia. There it took a leading part in the siege, and in after life, Dr. Munson had many incidents to tell of the operations and surrender. Returning north he rejoined his regiment, which in 1781-82 was the Fourth Connecticut, under Col. Butler, with Dr. Timothy Hosmer as Chief Surgeon. Remaining in the Highlands, he served until the disbandment in June, 1783.

    Cincinnati:

    Original member.

    References:

    Connecticut. Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. pp. 337, 354 && 374

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 407.

    Donald Lines Jacobus, comp., v. 6. Salem, Mass: Higginson Book Co., 1994. p. 1307.

    Henry Phelps Johnston, Yale and her honor-roll in the American revolution, 1775-1783. New York : Privately printed [by G.P. Putnam’s Sons], 1888. pp. 345-346.

    Howard A. Kelly, A Cyclopedia of American Medical Biography: Comprising the Lives of Eminent Deceased Physicians And Surgeons From 1610 to 1910. Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders Co., 1912. pp. 835-836.

    Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field-Book of the Revolution, v. 1. Gretna, Louisiana: Pelican Publishing Co., 2008, p. 430.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray.

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  • 2nd Lt Isaiah Tiffany

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    Birth:

    Isaiah Tiffany was born at Lebanon, Connecticut on 16 February 1759. He was the son of John Tiffany and Mary Meacham.

    Death:

    He died at New Canaan, New York on 12 December 1800.

    Marriage:

    On 4 June 1789, Isaiah Tiffany married Anne Whiting (1762-1830).

    Children:

    The children of Isaiah Tiffany and his wife, Anne, were as follows: Nancy Whiting Tiffany (1791-1849) who married Elihu Phinney; John Lathrop Tiffany (1792-1878) who married Abbey Hoadley; Frederick Trench Tiffany (1795-1863) who married Hetty Elvira Moore; Harriet Bradford Tiffany (1798-1830) who married Charles S. Stewart; and Isaiah Whiting Tiffany (1801-1889) who married Mary Metcalf in early May 1826 at Albany, New York. Mary was the daughter of the late Judge Metcalf. Isaiah Whiting Tiffany was survived by a son and a daughter.

    Military:

    Corporal 1st Connecticut, 14th April, 1777; Sergeant 1st June, 1777; Ensign, 1st January 1778; transferred to 5th Connecticut 1st January, 1781; 2d Lieutenant, 22nd April, 1781; transferred to 2d Connecticut, 1st January 1783; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment 3d June 1783, and served to 3d November, 1783.

    Isaiah Tiffany fought in 18 battles, including Monmouth and Yorktown, and was at Valley Forge. He was one of the forlorn hope in the storming of the redoubts at Yorktown. He was present at the hanging of Major Andre.

    References:

    ”Married”. Albany (New York) Argus, 11 May 1826, p. 3.

    Connecticut, Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p. 353.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 543.

    ”Isaiah Tiffany”. New York (New York) Tribune, Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 07 August 1889, p. 7.

    Nelson Otis Tiffany, The Tiffanys of America: History And Genealogy. Buffalo: N. O. Tiffany, 1901. pp. 126-127.

    ”Died”. Western Star, Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 19 January 1801, p. 3.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Maj John Palgrave Wyllys

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    Military:

    Adjutant of Wolcott’s Connecticut State Regiment, January, 1776; Brigade-Major to General Wadsworth, 7th August, 1776; taken prisoner 15th September, 1776, on the retreat from New York; exchanged 20th December, 1776; Captain of Webb’s Additional Continental Regiment, 1st January, 1777; Major, 10th October, 1778; transferred to 3d Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; transferred to 1st Connecticut, 1st January, 1783; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment, June, 1783, and served to 25th December, 1783; Major United States Infantry Regiment, 9th June, 1785; Major 1st Infantry United States Army, 29th September, 1789; killed 22d October, 1790, in action with Indians on the Miami, Ohio.

    References:

    Connecticut, Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p.351

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 608.

    Military service posted by V. Allen Gray.

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  • 2nd Lt James Bennett

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    Birth:

    James Bennett was born 14 May 1755 at New Milford, Litchfield County, Connecticut. His parents were Caleb Bennett (1716-1790) and Abigail Fowler (abt. 1727-1771).

    Death:

    He died 14 November 1819 at Homer, Cortland County, New York.

    His death was noted in the New York Columbian:

    Another revolutionary patriot gone – At Cortland Village, Col. James Bennet, aged 64. He held a commission in the army of the revolution, and was interred with the honors of masonry.

    The following appeared in the Cortland Republican:

    Died – In this town on the evening of the 13th inst. Col. James BENNET, aged 64, leaving a wife and a large family of children, to lament the loss of a tender husband, a kind and benevolent parent, and one of those early patriots that were signalized by gaining the liberty which they now enjoy.

    Col. BENNET held a commission in the army of the revolution. He was early enrolled under the banner which waved with various prospects for a number of years, amidst the perils of our revolution. He was engaged in a number of the bloody contests that signalized our emancipation; and whether the American eagle retired amidst carnage and destruction from a superior force, or triumphed over our oppressors, and waved victory to its followers, and liberty to its country, his hand was always ready to support the pillar of freedom.

    His neighbors and friends, in disposing of his remains, have demonstrated their respect for the man, and those who have broken the shackles of slavery. He was duly interred by his Masonic brethren, with the usual ceremonies of that order.

    Marriage:

    On 21 November 1784 at Catskill, Greene County, New York, he married Catharine Bogardus. James Bennett died intestate and his wife, Catherine, was granted administration of his estate on 31 October 1821.

    Children:

    James Bennett and Catharine Bogardus had seven children: Nancy Bennett, Adolphus B. Bennett, James A. Bennett, Robert Bennett, Angeline Bennett, Eugene Bennett, and Catharine Bennett.

    Military:

    Sergeant Major of 7th Connecticut, 25th January, 1777; Ensign, 1st September, 1777; 2d Lieutenant, 8th September, 1780; transferred to 2d Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment, June, 1783; and served to 3d November, 1783.

    James Bennett began his Connecticut service in January 1777; he had served already for a year and a half in the New York Continental Line. He detailed his New York service in 1818, when in reduced circumstances, he gave the following deposition in support of a pension application:

    State of New York

    Cortland County

    James Bennet of Homer in the county of Cortland aforesaid State of New York being duly sworn saith that he this deponent is an actual reside of the Town of Homer — that this deponent served in the revolutionary war against the common enemy as follows, to wit, this deponent enlisted in the fore part of the year 1775 into Capt. Daniel Mills Company in the fourth

    [Dutchess] Regiment of the New York line commanded by Col. James Holmes and served as Sergeant in the company until the last day of Decr. in the same year whose time of service expired — further that in the forepart of Jany. 1776 this deponent enlisted into the first New York Regiment commanded by Col. Goose Van Schaick where he served in the capacity of Sergeant Major until the last day of Decr. of that year inclusive when his period of service expired — that in the year 1777 he this deponent was commissioned as an Ensign in the 2nd Connecticut Regiment of foot commanded by Col. Henan Swift in which Regt. and capacity this deponent served until the first day of September 1778 at which time he this deponent was commissioned as a Lieutenant in said Regiment in which office this deponent served until 1783 at the close of the war and was disbanded with the army at west point in June 1783 when the preliminary articles of peace were published and was liable to be called into actual service again until the arrival of the definitive treaty of peace when congress resolved that they had no further service for the continental army — and this deponent further saith that from his reduced circumstances he is in need of assistance from his country — that at the Battle of Monmouth he received a musket shot in his under jaw — that his is old and infirm & has a wife & three children to provide for with no resources but his daily labor —

    And this deponent further saith that on the Eleventh day of Feby. 1798, his house was consumed by an accidental fire & his commissions and all his private papers were also consumed —

    And the said James Bennett hereby relinquishes all claims to any and every pension heretofore granted or allowed him by any law of the United States.

    James Bennet

    Sworn this 13th Day of April 1818.

    Cincinnati:

    Original Member.

    Discussion:

    James Bennett’s father, Caleb Bennett, was a member of New Milford, Connecticut’s Committee of Inspection and Correspondence.

    James’ oldest brother, Isaac Bennett (b. 1747) lived at Stockbridge, Massachusetts and was member of a militia unit in that location. Another brother, Samuel Bennett (b. 1750) is reported in one source to have been a Captain in the Revolution; however, that has not been confirmed. A younger brother, Caleb (b. 1758) was a member of a New Milford militia company from mid 1776 until late 1779 when he moved to Stockbridge, Massachusetts to live with his brother, Isaac.

    References:

    Abstracts of Wills, Administrations and Guardianships in NY State, 1787 – 1835. (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006.) Original manuscript in Eardeley Genealogy Collection: New York State Abstracts of Wills, Brooklyn Historical Society. Cortland, p. 574.

    Connecticut. Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. pp. 218, 328, 352 & 373.

    Cortland Republican, 18 Nov 1819. (http://www.usgenweb.info/nycortland/vitals/d1815-21.htm : accessed 05 March 2015)

    Frank Hasbrouck, The History of Dutchess County, New York, v. 1. Poughkeepsie: S. A. Matthieu, 1909. p. 122.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 99.

    Frank Hasbrouck, ed.,The History of Dutchess County, New York, vol. 1. Poughkeepsie, N.Y.: S. A. Matthieu, 1909, pp. 120-122.

    Donald Lines Jacobus, History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, v. 1. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2007. p. 73.

    “Died”, New-York Columbian, 01 December 1819. p. 2, col. 5.

    Samuel Orcutt, History of the Towns of New Milford and Bridgewater, Connecticut, 1703-1882. Hartford: Press of Case, Lockwood and Brainard Co., 1882. pp. 217, 651-652.

    Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 15. Fold3.com(http://www.fold3.com/image/15190966/). Connecticut. James Bennett, Pension W. 16191.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Capt Lemuel Clift

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    Death:

    Lemuel Clift died in 1821.

    Military:

    Private in the Lexington Alarm, April, 1775; Sergeant 6th Connecticut, 6th May to 15th December, 1775; Ensign 10th Continental Infantry, 1st January, 1776; 1st Lieutenant 4th Connecticut, 1st January 1777; Captain Lieutenant, 1st June 1778; Captain, 20th May, 1779; transferred to 1st Connecticut, 1st January 1781; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment June, 1783, and served to 3d November, 1783.

    References:

    Connecticut, Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p. 355.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 160.

    Military service posted by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Capt Richard Douglas/Douglass (CT/NY)

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    Death:

    Richard Douglas died in 1816.

    Military:

    Private in the Lexington Alarm, April, 1775; Ensign and Regimental Quartermaster in Selden’s Connecticut State Regiment, 20th June to 25th December, 1776; 2d Lieutenant 1st Connecticut, 1st January, 1777; 1st Lieutenant, 1st January 1778; Captain Lieutenant, 11th August, 1780; Captain, 22d August 1780; transferred to 5th Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; transferred to 3d Connecticut, 1st January, 1783; transferred to Swift’s Consolidated Connecticut Regiment, June, 1783, and served to 3d November, 1783.

    References:

    Connecticut, Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p. 353.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 202.

    Military service posted by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Capt Jonathan Heart/Hart

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    Birth:

    Jonathan Heart was born in 1748 in Kensington, Connecticut, a part of Farmington. He was the second son of Deacon Ebenezer Hart and his wife, Elizabeth Lawrence Hart. Deacon Hart was a descendant of Stephan Hart, who was among the early settlers of Hartford and Farmington.

    Ebenezer and Elizabeth had five sons: Ebenezer Hart, born 29 July 1742, who removed to New Hampshire. Jonathan Hart, our subject, born in 1748. Elihu Hart, born 4 March 1751, who removed to New York where he failed in business and died in debtor’s prison at Coxsackie, New York. Doctor John Hart born 11 March 1753, who served in the army as a surgeon, and died 3 October 1798. Thomas Hart, born in 1754, never married, and died in 1832. Thomas Hart adopted Lydia Hart, the daughter of his brother Ebenezer.

    Death:

    Jonathan Heart, serving as a Major with the 2d United States Infantry, was killed 04 November 1791 while covering the retreat of Gen. St. Clair’s army after it was surprised and defeated near the source of the Maumee River in Ohio. A month later, his remains were identified and subsequently buried with remains of others from the battlefield. St. Clair’s army consisted of men from the militias of Kentucky, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and North Carolina along with a battalion of the 2d United States Infantry. Of St. Clair’s force of over 1,400 men, 632 were killed and 264 wounded in the battle.

    Marriage:

    Jonathan Heart married to Abigail Riley in 1777. On 03 August 1797, nearly six years after the death of Jonathan Heart, Abigail married the Rev. Cyprian Strong of Chatham, Connecticut.

    Children:

    Jonathan Heart left one child, a son, Alces Everlin Heart who was born 10 October 1782. Alces Everlin Heart was married to Charlotte Overton. They had no children.

    Education:

    Jonathan Heart graduated from Yale College in 1768.

    Occupation:

    Shortly after graduating from Yale, Jonathan Heart removed to New Jersey where he served as a district schoolmaster until about 1773 when he returned to Farmington, Connecticut. There he was engaged in mercantile operations. When war broke out, he turned his business over to his brother and enlisted in Putnam’s battalion of Connecticut militia. He participated in the Battle of Bunker Hill.

    Military:

    Served as a volunteer with 2d Connecticut, May to December, 1775; Ensign 22d Continental Infantry, 1st January, 1776; 2d Lieutenant, 10th August, 1776; Adjutant 3d Connecticut, 1st January, 1777; Captain Lieutenant, 1st July 1779; Captain, 1st May, 1780; transferred to 1st Connecticut, 1st January, 1781; Brigade Major and Inspector, 2nd January, 1781 to June, 1783; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Battalion in June, 1783, and served to 3d November, 1783.

    At the end of the war, Jonathan Heart returned homw to a failed business. After attempting to establish a career as a surveyor, he enlisted in the Army. He served as a Captain United States Infantry Regiment, 9th June, 1785; Captain 1st United States Infantry, 29th September, 1789; and Major 2d United States Infantry, 4th March 1791. He was shot and killed on 04 November 1791 in action with Indians during St. Clair’s defeat near Fort Recovery, Ohio.

    Cincinnati:

    Jonathan Heart was a original member.

    Discussion:

    Jonathan Heart’s younger brother, John Heart, also served as an officer in the Revolution. Jonathan and his brother, John, both spelled their surname as “Heart” rather than “Hart”.

    Jonathan Heart was a member of one of two traveling Masonic Lodges at West Point, American Union No. 1. Among the other members were Col. Samuel Wyllys, Lt. Robert Allyn, Capt. Stephen Betts, Dr. John Simpson, Dr. Jedediah Ensworth, Col. Rufus Putnam, Lt. Isaac Tiffany and others of the Connecticut Line. Dr. Simpson was the lodge Secretary.

    References:

    Edward M. Coffman. The Old Army: A Portrait of the American Army in Peacetime, 1784-1898. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986. pp. 5, 25 & 35

    Connecticut. Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. pp. 351 & 373.

    Jonathan Heart, Journal of Capt. Jonathan Heart On the March With His Company From Connecticut to Fort Pitt, In Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Albany, N.Y.: J. Munsell’s sons, 1885. pp. viii – xiii.

    Gary L. Heinmiller, Membership in American Union Lodge No. 1 during the Revolutionary War. (http://www.omdhs.syracusemasons.com/sites/default/files/history/American%20Union%20Lodge%20No.%201%20-%20Membership.pdf)

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 283.

    Francis B. Heitman. Historical Register of the United States Army, From Its Organization, September 29, 1789, to September 29, 1889. Washington, D.C.: National Tribune, 1890. p. 333.

    James Ripley Jacobs. The Beginning of the U.S. Army, 1782-1812. Fort Washington, N.Y.: Kennikat Press, 1972. pp. 32-33 & 89,

    Henry Phelps Johnston, Yale And Her Honor-roll In the American Revolution, 1775-1783: Including Original Letters, Records of Service, And Biographical Sketches. New York: Privately printed [by G.P. Putnam’s Sons], 1888. pp. 252-254.

    Catherine M. North, History of Berlin, Connecticut. New Haven: Tuttle, 1916. pp. 65-66.

    Wiley Sword. President Washington’s Indian War: the struggle for the Old Northwest, 1790-1795. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1993. pp 82, 181 & 184.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray

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  • Lt-Col Ebenezer Huntington

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    Death:

    Ebenezer Huntington died on 17 June 1834.

    Military:

    Served in the Lexington Alarm, April, 1775; 1st Lieutenant 2d Connecticut, 8th September to 10th December, 1775; 1st Lieutenant 22d Continental Infantry, 1st January, 1776; Captain , May, 1776; Brigade Major to General Heath, August, 1776; Major of Webb’s Continental Regiment, 1st January, 1777; Lieutenant Colonel, 10th October, 1778; transferred to 1st Connecticut, 1st January, 1783; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment, June, 1783, and served to 3d November, 1783; Brigadier General United States Army, 19th July, 1798; honorably discharged, 15th June, 1800.

    References:

    Connecticut, Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p. 354.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 310.

    Military service posted by V. Allen Gray.

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  • Ensign Jacob Kingsbury

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    Birth:

    Jacob Kingsbury was born 06 July 1756 at Franklin, Connecticut.

    Death:

    Jacob Kingsbury died at Franklin, Connecticut on 01 July 1837. On 19 July 1837, the Norwich Courier published the following obituary for Jacob Kingsbury

    At Franklin, July 1st, Jacob Kingsbury, Esq., formerly Inspector General in the army of the United States, aged 81 years. He served his country in the army and Navy forty years, faithfully. He joined the army at Roxbury, near Boston, in the year 1775, at the commencement of the Revolution, in the 18th year of his age, and continued in the service of the U.S. until 1815, at the close of the war with the English. For 30 years previous to the close of the last war, he had not been a day out of the army. He was a member of the Society Cincinnati – also a member of the United States military Philosophical Society, and of the Lyceum of Natural History in the city of New York.

    Military:

    Private and Corporal 8th Connecticut, 11th July to 16th December, 1775; Sergeant Selden’s Connecticut State Regiment, June to December, 1776; Ensign of Webb’s Continental Regiment, 26th April, 1780; transferred to 3d Connecticut 1st January, 1781; retained in Swift’s Connecticut Regiment, June 1783, and served to 3d November, 1783.

    Lieutenant United States Infantry Regiment, 15th October, 1787; Lieutenant 1st United States Infantry, 29th September, 1789; Captain, 28th September, 1791; assigned to 1st Sub Legion, 4th September, 1792; assigned to 1st United States Infantry, 1st November 1796; Major 2d infantry, 15th May 1797; Lieutenant-Colonel 1st Infantry, 11th April, 1803; Colonel, 18th August, 1808. (Colonel Inspector-General, 8th April, 1813 to 31st October, 1814.) Honorably discharged upon the reorganization of the Army, 15th June, 1815.

    When discharged in June 1815, Jacob Kingsbury’s eight year’s of service during the Revolution and continuous service since 1787 probably made him the senior man in years of service in the army.

    Cincinnati:

    Original member.

    References:

    Edward M. Coffman. The old army: a portrait of the American Army in peacetime, 1784-1898. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986. p. 44.

    Connecticut, Adjutant-General’s Office. Record of Service of Connecticut Men In the I. War of the Revolution, II. War of 1812, III. Mexican War. Hartford: [Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.], 1889. p. 352.

    Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution April, 1775, to December, 1783. Washington, D.C.: The Rare Book Shop Publishing Company, 1914. p. 333.

    Francis B. Heitman. Historical Register of the United States Army, From Its Organization, September 29, 1789, to September 29, 1889. Washington, D.C.: National Tribune, 1890. p. 390.

    James Ripley Jacobs. The Beginning of the U.S. Army, 1782-1812. Fort Washington, N.Y.: Kennikat Press, 1972. p. 173.

    “Died”, em>Norwich (Connecticut> Courier, 19 July 1837, p. 3; digital image, GenealogyBank.com (http://www.GenealogyBank.com : accessed 12 January 2016).

    Wiley Sword. President Washington’s Indian War: the struggle for the Old Northwest, 1790-1795. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1993. pp 127-128.

    Biographical information compiled by V. Allen Gray.

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